Table 1.

Studies examining corticosteroid therapy in acute tubulointerstitial nephritis

Author, Year (Reference)Sample SizePeak sCr, mg/dlFinal sCr, mg/dlFollow-Up, moComment
SteroidNo SteroidSteroidNo SteroidSteroidNo Steroid
Clarkson et al. (11)26167.96.11.61.612Patients received CS late after diagnosis (median delay >3 wk)
González et al. (4)5295.94.92.13.719CS-treated patients with complete recovery had shorter delay to CS (13 d) compared with those without complete recovery (34 d)
Raza et al. (5)37126.55.22.83.419Improved eGFR with CS versus control (P<0.05); no difference in kidney outcomes on the basis of CS timing
Muriithi et al. (6)83123.04.51.41.56CS-treated patients had better kidney outcomes with early versus late CS therapy
Valluri et al. (7)73514.033.16N/AN/A12Worse kidney function in CS-treated patients versus controls at biopsy (sCr 4.2 versus 3.3 mg/dl); CS-treated patients had complete recovery (48%) versus control group (41%); final sCr was not different at 1 yr
Prendecki et al. (3)1582921 ml/min (eGFR)25 ml/min (eGFR)43 ml/min (eGFR)24 ml/min (eGFR)24CS-treated patients had better eGFR at 2 yr and less dialysis (5% versus 24%); dose, duration, and time to CS initiation were variable
Fernandez-Juarez et al. 2018 (8)18205.7N/A1.7–2.2N/A6Duration of CS therapy was not associated with 6-mo recovery of eGFR; shorter interval between diagnosis and CS initiation was associated with greater recovery of kidney function at 6 mo
  • sCr, serum creatinine concentration; CS, corticosteroid; N/A, not available.