Table 3.

Extent to which CKD can be attributed to diabetes among adults in the United States

Parameter, %Albuminuria ACR≥30 mg/gMacroalbuminuria ACR≥300 mg/geGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m2eGFR<30 ml/min per 1.73 m2Any CKD
Prevalence among all United States adults4.4 (3.9 to 4.9)0.8 (0.6 to 1.0)3.5 (2.9 to 4.0)0.6 (0.5 to 0.7)7.3 (6.6 to 8.0)
Prevalence among United States adults without diabetes3.1 (2.7 to 3.6)0.4 (0.2 to 0.5)2.7 (2.2 to 3.3)0.4 (0.3 to 0.5)5.6 (4.9 to 6.2)
Prevalence attributable to diabetes1.2 (1.0 to 1.5)0.4 (0.3 to 0.6)0.7 (0.4 to 1.1)0.2 (0.1 to 0.3)1.7 (1.4 to 2.1)
Proportion attributable to diabetes28 (22 to 34)54 (43 to 67)21 (12 to 31)30 (19 to 41)24 (19 to 29)
  • Estimates and 95% confidence intervals are on the basis of 500 bootstrap samples and incorporate bootstrap estimates of persistence. Estimates for prevalence among United States adults without diabetes are standardized for age, sex, and race/ethnicity to United States population. Prevalence attributable to diabetes is defined as the difference in prevalence among all United States adults and United States adults without diabetes; proportion attributable to diabetes is defined as 100 times the ratio of the prevalence attributable to diabetes to the prevalence among all United States adults. ACR, albumin-to-creatinine ratio.